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SalesGrowth MD, Inc. | Lone Tree, CO
 

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Chuck Terry

Every salesperson lives for the thrill of the closing the deal. That magical moment when you realize the sale is going to happen is one of the greatest experiences for professional salespeople. It’s what keeps them going through the all-too-frequent rejections.

Remember, though, the lyrics from the classic Kenny Rogers song, The Gambler: “You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em, know when to walk away, and know when to run.” The song was about poker of course, but that advice can be applied to sales situations as well.

No matter how successful you are in business you could still use more high-quality sales prospects right? I don’t come across many businesses that don’t answer that question with a resounding yes.

Everyone knows the usual tips for adding more prospects like make more cold calls, attend more networking events, or ask for more referrals from existing customers. All are certainly good advice but not exactly revelations.

Upselling is a vital function of many firm’s growth strategy after the initial sale. Whether executed by a company’s Account Managers or by the business’s service team it as an essential, tried and true part of expanding business within existing accounts.

Downselling is something altogether different as it involves intentionally selling less to a prospect than they originally intended to buy on the front end of the sale.

Okay, so it isn’t EXACTLY the same but there are certainly many similarities that we can learn from in business development.

1) If you spend all your time talking on the first date how likely is it there will be a second date? The most interesting person on a date is the one most interested in the other person.

That approach works pretty well in selling too. We have an axiom called the 70/30 Rule which reminds sellers that 70% of the sales call should be spent listening to the prospect and NOT talking.

I first began considering this question after reading Dan Pink’s most recent book “To Sell Is Human.” If you haven’t read it yet put it on your list. There was significant research presented in the book to indicate that a savvy seller might be better served helping clients “find problems” rather than the more traditional role of a “problem solver.”

What are your personal and professional limitations? What are you truly capable of if you just stretch a bit further?

The sad reality for most of us is that the majority of our limitations are self-imposed. Our true limits are almost always FAR beyond where we think they are.

The reason for this is what we call “head trash” and, trust me, we ALL have some. Our head trash is usually the result of self-limiting beliefs that, in many cases, have been in place since early childhood.

LinkedIn is a powerful prospecting tool. That fact is beyond a shadow of a doubt.

What IS somewhat in doubt is exactly what that means in terms of how it is used. My personal position is that LinkedIn is great for identifying potential leads, getting introduced to those leads, and nurturing an online relationship.

Credibility is defined as “the quality of being convincing and believable” or “the quality of being trusted and believed in.” Is there anything more important in the world of sales?

I don’t think many people in professional sales, or any profession for that matter, would put up too much of an argument to the idea that the way we buy has changed. The internet, social media, more sophisticated methods of advertising, and many other factors have driven this change.

 

 

With apologies to Paul Simon, there are countless books filled with newer, better, and numerous ways for salespeople to “close” a sale.

I once did a training engagement for a firm that had previously required their sellers to “close” a MINIMUM of 15 times before leaving an appointment! Seriously? That isn’t selling it’s more like a high-pressure exercise in pissing off prospects.

According to Alex Baldwin's character in the movie "Glengarry Glen Ross" you should ALWAYS be closing. That, my friends, is old school hog wash.